Меню

64 bit version of windows 7 requirements

64 bit version of windows 7 requirements

If you want to run Windows 7 on your PC, here’s what it takes:

1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor

1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit)

16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)

DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver

Additional requirements to use certain features:

Internet access (fees may apply)

Depending on resolution, video playback may require additional memory and advanced graphics hardware

For some Windows Media Center functionality a TV tuner and additional hardware may be required

Windows Touch and Tablet PCs require specific hardware

HomeGroup requires a network and PCs running Windows 7

DVD/CD authoring requires a compatible optical drive

BitLocker requires Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 1.2

BitLocker To Go requires a USB flash drive

Windows XP Mode requires an additional 1 GB of RAM, an additional 15 GB of available hard disk space, and a processor capable of hardware virtualization with Intel VT or AMD-V turned on

Music and sound require audio output

Product functionality and graphics may vary based on your system configuration. Some features may require advanced or additional hardware.

If you’ve gone PC shopping lately, you’ve probably noticed more computers with 64-bit processors, and you may have wondered what advantages they offer.

Put simply, a 64-bit PC can handle larger amounts of information than a 32-bit system. Since it can use more RAM—4 GB and up—a 64-bit computer can be more responsive when you’re running lots of programs at once.

Which should you buy? If you tend to have a lot of programs open simultaneously or need to switch frequently between programs—or if you just want to be sure your PC can take advantage of the larger amounts of memory available today—64-bit is a great choice. If you run only one or two programs at a time or have older hardware and software that isn’t supported by a 64-bit PC, a 32-bit system is a good choice.

Whether you choose the 32-bit or the 64-bit system, Windows 7 is ready.

Watch, pause, and record live TV. Listen to your tunes. Show off your photo collection. Enjoy online entertainment. And do it all from your living-room couch. Is it any wonder critics call Media Center the hidden gem of Windows?

In Windows 7, we’ve made it even better—adding great new features (many suggested by you) and visual touch-ups. Windows Media Center is available in the Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate editions of Windows 7.

More watching.

Windows Media Center supports more global TV standards and tuners, including digital and HD. It also now plays more popular audio and video formats—including 3GP, AAC, AVCHD, DivX, MOV, and Xvid.

. less waiting

Tired of trudging through TV listings or a massive music library? Zip to songs and shows more quickly using the new Turbo Scroll feature.

Stunning new slide shows

Make elegant photo collages (with background music) using the new slide show maker—perfect for parties or family get-togethers. And check out the updated slide show screen saver—its stunning visuals defy words.

Easier media sharing

Enjoy recorded TV shows, music, video—even when it’s not stored on your PC. The new HomeGroup feature makes media available to any PC withWindows 7 in the house.

New gadget, bigger previews

A new Media Center gadget. Quick video skimming. More song and show details. Bigger, easier-to-see preview thumbnails. The improvements go on and on.

Move over mouse: With Windows 7 and a touch-sensitive screen, you can browse online newspapers, flick through photo albums, and shuffle files and folders—using nothing but your fingers.

Limited touch technology has been available in Windows for years. But Windows 7 extends it to every corner of your PC. The Start menu and taskbar now sport larger, fingertip-friendly icons. Familiar Windows 7 programs are also touch-ready. You can even finger paint in Paint!

Windows Touch—available only in the Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate editions of Windows 7—also recognizes multitouch gestures (with the right monitor). Need to zoom in on a picture? Pinch your fingers together. Want to right-click on something? Touch it with one finger and tap the screen with a second on the screen.

HomeGroup takes the headache out of sharing files and printers on a home network. Connect two or more PCs running Windows 7, and HomeGroup makes it easy to automatically start sharing your music, pictures, video, and document libraries with others in your home. The new “Share with” menu, meanwhile, provides a speedy way to share individual files.

Concerned about privacy? So are we. That’s why HomeGroup is password-protected and puts you in total control. You decide what gets shared—and what stays private. You can also make your files «read only,» so other people can look at (but not touch) your stuff.

You can join a homegroup in any edition of Windows 7, but you can only create one in Home Premium, Professional, or Ultimate.

How can you help protect your data from loss, theft, or hackers? The answer: BitLocker.

Improved for Windows 7 and available in the Ultimate edition, BitLocker helps keep everything from documents to passwords safer by encrypting the entire drive that Windows and your data reside on. Once BitLocker is turned on, any file you save on that drive is encrypted automatically.

BitLocker To Go—a new feature of Windows 7—gives the lockdown treatment to easily-misplaced portable storage devices like USB flash drives and external hard drives.

How can you help protect your data from loss, theft, or hackers? The answer: BitLocker.

Improved for Windows 7 and available in the Ultimate edition, BitLocker helps keep everything from documents to passwords safer by encrypting the entire drive that Windows and your data reside on. Once BitLocker is turned on, any file you save on that drive is encrypted automatically.

BitLocker To Go—a new feature of Windows 7—gives the lockdown treatment to easily-misplaced portable storage devices like USB flash drives and external hard drives.

It’s the best of both worlds: The new Windows XP Mode lets you run older Windows XP business software right on your Windows 7 desktop.

The feature, designed primarily with small- and medium-sized businesses in mind, comes as a separate download and works only with Windows 7Professional and Ultimate. Windows XP Mode also requires virtualization software such as Windows Virtual PC. Both are available free on the Microsoft website.

To download Windows XP Mode or learn about its system requirements, visit the Windows Virtual PC website.

Источник статьи: http://windows7.windowsreinstall.com/systemrequirements.htm

Windows 7 system requirements

Support for Windows 7 ended on January 14, 2020

We recommend you move to a Windows 10 PC to continue to receive security updates from Microsoft.

If you want to run Windows 7 on your PC, here’s what it takes:

1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor*

1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit)

16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)

DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver

Additional requirements to use certain features:

Internet access (fees may apply)

Depending on resolution, video playback may require additional memory and advanced graphics hardware

Some games and programs might require a graphics card compatible with DirectX 10 or higher for optimal performance

For some Windows Media Center functionality a TV tuner and additional hardware may be required

Windows Touch and Tablet PCs require specific hardware

HomeGroup requires a network and PCs running Windows 7

DVD/CD authoring requires a compatible optical drive

BitLocker requires Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 1.2

BitLocker To Go requires a USB flash drive

Windows XP Mode requires an additional 1 GB of RAM and an additional 15 GB of available hard disk space.

Music and sound require audio output

Product functionality and graphics may vary based on your system configuration. Some features may require advanced or additional hardware.

PCs with multi-core processors:

Windows 7 was designed to work with today’s multi-core processors. All 32-bit versions of Windows 7 can support up to 32 processor cores, while 64‑bit versions can support up to 256 processor cores.

PCs with multiple processors (CPUs):

Commercial servers, workstations, and other high-end PCs may have more than one physical processor. Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate allow for two physical processors, providing the best performance on these computers. Windows 7 Starter, Home Basic, and Home Premium will recognize only one physical processor.

* Prior versions of Windows, including Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, have limited support when running on new processors and chipsets from manufacturers like Intel, AMD, NVidia, and Qualcomm. For more information, please see the Support Lifecycle FAQ. A device may not be able to run prior versions of Windows if the device hardware is incompatible, lacking current drivers, or otherwise outside of the Original Equipment Manufacturer’s (“OEM”) support period.

Источник статьи: http://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/windows-7-system-requirements-df0900f2-3513-a851-13e7-0d50bc24e15f

Install Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

Support for Windows 7 ended on January 14, 2020

We recommend you move to a Windows 10 PC to continue to receive security updates from Microsoft.

The recommended (and easiest) way to get SP1 is to turn on automatic updating in Windows Update in Control Panel and wait for Windows 7 to notify you that SP1 is ready to install. It takes about 30 minutes to install, and you’ll need to restart your computer about halfway through the installation.

To check if Windows 7 SP1 is already installed on your PC, select the Start button, right-click Computer, and then select Properties.

If Service Pack 1 is listed under Windows edition, SP1 is already installed on your PC.

Before you begin

Check if your PC is 32-bit or 64-bit

You’ll need to know if your PC is running a 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) version of Windows 7. Select the Start button, right-click Computer, and then select Properties. The version of Windows 7 is displayed next to System type.

Disk space requirements

Check to make sure your PC has enough free disk space to install SP1.

Estimated amount of free disk space needed

Downloading SP1 from the Microsoft website

Back up important files

It’s a good idea to back up your important files, photos, and videos to an external hard disk, USB flash drive, or the cloud before installing the update.

Plug in and connect to the Internet

Make sure your PC is plugged in to power and you’re connected to the Internet.

Disable antivirus software

Some antivirus software might prevent SP1 from installing or slow down the installation. You can temporarily disable your antivirus software before the installation. If you do so, make sure you’re aware of the risks that might be involved and re-enable the antivirus software as soon as SP1 is done installing.

Installing Windows 7 SP1 using Windows Update (recommended)

If your PC is set to automatically install updates, you’ll be prompted by Windows Update to install SP1. Follow the instructions to install the update.

To manually install SP1 from Windows Update:

Select the Start button > All programs > Windows Update.

In the left pane, select Check for updates.

If any important updates are found, select the link to view available updates. In the list of updates, select Service Pack for Microsoft Windows (KB976932) and then select OK.

Note: If SP1 isn’t listed, you might need to install some other updates before installing SP1. Install any important updates and then follow these steps again to check for SP1.

Select Install updates. You might be asked for an admin password or to confirm your choice.

Follow the instructions to install SP1.

After SP1 is installed, sign in to your PC. You might see a notification indicating whether the update was successful. If you disabled your antivirus software before the installation, make sure you turn it back on.

Downloading and installing Windows SP1 from the Microsoft Download Center

If you’re unable to install SP1 from Windows Update, you can download the installation package from the Microsoft Download Center and then install SP1 manually.

Go to the Windows 7 Service Pack 1 download page on the Microsoft website.

Select Install Instructions to see which packages are available for download, and make note of the one that you need.

Select the appropriate language from the drop-down list, and then select Download.

Select the packages you need to install, select Next, and then follow the instructions to install SP1. Your PC might restart a few times during the installation.

After SP1 is installed, sign in to your PC. You might see a notification indicating whether the update was successful. If you disabled your antivirus software before the installation, make sure you turn it back on.

Troubleshoot problems installing Windows SP1

If you try to install SP1 and see an error message that the installation wasn’t successful, this might be because there’s a problem with the Windows Servicing Store that is used to install updates or because your antivirus software is preventing the update from being installed.

To try and fix the problem, follow these steps and then try to install SP1 again.

Download and run the System Update Readiness Tool

Select the link in the table that corresponds with the version of Windows running on your PC.

Link to Microsoft Download Center

On the Microsoft Download Center page, select your language and then select Download. It might take a few minutes for the tool to download and install.

To install the tool immediately, select Open or Run and then follow the instructions. To use the tool later, select Save and download the installation files to your PC.

On the Windows Update Standalone Installer screen, select Yes or OK.

On the Installation complete screen, select Close.

Try installing the service pack again.

Run the Windows Update troubleshooter

If your PC isn’t able to find or install updates, the Windows Update troubleshooter might be able to fix the problem.

Select the Start button, and then select Control Panel.

In the search box, enter troubleshooter and then select Troubleshooting from the list of results.

Under System and Security, select Fix problems with Windows Update and then follow the instructions.

After the troubleshooter is done, try installing the service pack again.

Источник статьи: http://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/install-windows-7-service-pack-1-sp1-b3da2c0f-cdb6-0572-8596-bab972897f61


Adblock
detector